CMS vs Framework: Defining The Difference

Somewhere during the journey of getting your website built you’ve most likely heard the acronym “CMS” thrown around. But what do those three crazy little letters mean? Well, CMS stands for Content Management System. The name itself is pretty self-explanatory, but to be more concise, a CMS is just computer software that provides you with a pre-built interface for managing (adding, editing, deleting) content on your website. Ever heard of Drupal or WordPress? How about Magento or Joomla? Maybe ExpressionEngine? Chances are one of the names rang a bell, because each one of these systems has played a big role in making the web a friendlier place for non-developers (primarily the first two, if we’re being honest here).

• • •

Tumblr…as a CMS?

I’m incredibly proud of the clients I’ve worked with during my time as a developer at O3 World. Over the years they’ve ranged from everyone to household names, to Ivy League schools, to companies that have IPO’d for almost a billion dollars. Oh yeah, and one time, I built a Tumblr theme.

• • •

Pros and Cons of Drupal Commerce

Since the dawn of mankind…well, no, since about the mid-1990’s, eCommerce has become one of the most complex and important problems to solve on the world wide web. With $1.2 billion dollars spent online last year on Black Friday alone and more than four in five smartphone users using their devices for online shopping, eCommerce is turning out to be the equivalent of an untapped goldmine right under your house. Such a lucrative opportunity brings an unsurprising response: more and more retailers are looking to make their presence known online.

• • •

Refining Your QA Process

A lot of acronyms get thrown around during a project. From CMS, to PSD, to B2B; but there’s one important acronym we haven’t really discussed yet: QA. For those of you who are unfamiliar, QA stands for Quality Assurance and is typically one of the final phases of a project during which your work undergoes critique from several other departments. The QA process is not mean-spirited, it is necessary as well as beneficial to ensure that the final product is up to the company’s standards and client’s needs. Nonetheless, despite its good intentions, QA can be a scary phase in a project’s lifecycle.

• • •

From Developer to…Better Developer: A Year In Review

About 8 years ago, as a junior in high school, I accidentally enrolled myself in a class called “Programming with Java.” I had intended to sign myself up for a different class with a similar ID number, but my 17-year-old self  “don’t pay too much attention to what you’re doing” mentality intervened. Or maybe it was the hands of fate. Yeah, let’s go with that.

• • •